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Scripps Scientific Team

Gerald M. Edelman, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Edelman is Chairman of the Department of Neurobiology at The Scripps Research institute. He has made significant research contributions in biophysics, protein chemistry, immunology, cell biology, and neurobiology. His early studies on the structure and diversity of antibodies led to the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1972. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and several foreign societies, including the Academy of Sciences, Institute of France. He is author of 500+ research publications.

Vincent P. Mauro, Ph.D.

Dr. Mauro is an Associate Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at Scripps. Dr. Mauro investigates fundamental mechanisms of translation initiation. His studies provided the first demonstration of mRNA:rRNA basepairing as a translation initiation mechanism in eukaryotes, and the identification of cis-regulatory elements in mRNAs, which include TEEs. He and his colleagues demonstrated that powerful synthetic translational enhancers can be generated by linking together individual TEEs together. More recently, Dr. Mauro and his colleagues have developed selection methodologies to identify such elements in mammalian cells and in yeast.

Wei Zhou, Ph.D.

Dr. Zhou is a Staff Scientist at Scripps. He received his Ph.D. from Department of Cell and Molecular Biology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas and his postdoctoral training in the Department of Neurobiology at Scripps. Dr. Zhou completed his postdoctoral training under the direction of Dr. Mauro. Dr. Zhou's work led to the finding that some natural yeast mRNA 5' leaders contain IRES (Internal Ribosome Entry Sites). His subsequent studies led to the identification of TEEs in mammalian cells and chromosome integration sites for transgene expression.

Stephen A. Chappell, Ph.D.

Dr. Chappell is a Staff Scientist at Scripps. He received his Ph.D. at the University of Leicester Medical School in Leicester, England and his postdoctoral training in the Department of Biochemistry at the same University. Dr. Chappell completed his postdoctoral training at under the direction of Dr. Mauro. Dr. Chappell's work led to the finding that some mRNA 5' leaders are composed of modular regulatory elements, leading to the identification of the first TEE and to the generation of synthetic translational enhancers based on these elements. His subsequent studies led to the identification of numerous other regulatory elements and have helped to elucidate the mechanism by which several function.